How to Let Your Taste-buds Travel the World, Even if You Can’t

ottolenghi harissa

SHARE THIS STORY

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
ottolenghi harissa

How to Let Your Taste-buds Travel the World, Even if You Can’t

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Here’s our pick for the best cook books of 2020.

If ever there was a year for home cooking, it was this one.   Shut indoors, where better to turn than the kitchen for comfort, joy and inspiration. Our cookbooks have become our mood-lifters, our soul-mates, and a sneaky way for our taste-buds to travel even when we couldn’t get on a plane ourselves.  With Christmas gifts to ourselves in mind, here are some of the best new cookbooks of 2020, bringing the best of the world’s cuisines to our kitchens.

Ottolenghi mushrooms
Yotam Ottolenghi mushroom recipe here

Flavour, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage (Ten Speed Press)  Named one of the best cookbooks of the year by The New York Times and described as the culinary equivalent of being on a boat with Marco Polo. Vegetarian.

Coconut & Sambal by Lara Lee (Bloomsbury) Indonesian food from revered Australian-Indonesian food writer, with well-known recipes like nasi goring, satay and rending, combined with lesser known dishes.

In Bibi’s Kitchen, by Hawa Hassan  (Ten Speed Press) Cooking from East Africa: Eritrea, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Madagascar and Comoros.  The recipes come from bibis, which is another word for matriarchs, mistresses of home kitchens.  Largely vegetarian.

East, by Meera Sodha  (Flatiron Books) Vegan and vegetarian recipes from Bangalore to Beijing.

Cook, Eat Repeat, by Nigella Lawson (Chatto)  Heart warming and soothing classics like Wide Noodles with Lamb Shank in Aromatic Broth and Fish Finger Bhorta. Check out her recipe for Toasted Marshmallow And Rhubarb Cake ( image below) here.

Nigella cookbook

The Flavor Equation, The Science of Great Cooking Explained, by Nik Sharma  (Chronicle)  For science minded cooks who like to know why flavours work. A look at how the interplay of aromas, textures and visuals work in food.

Xi’an Famous Foods, by Jason Wang (and Jessica K Chou) Abrams).  The cuisine of Western China, via New York’s favourite noodle restaurant.    Spicy biang biang noodles to die for.

Falastin, by Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley (Ebury) The very best of Palestinian food.

Hero Image: A Super Chaat Recipe from Chef Yottam Ottolenghi

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

related articles

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

more stories

Join our mailing list

Never miss our seriously happy global news!
Subscribe to our weekly newsletter: