Rick Stein’s Roast Tronçon Of Turbot With Hollandaise Sauce

davd-griffen-photography-047 Turbot Hollandaise

SHARE THIS STORY

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
davd-griffen-photography-047 Turbot Hollandaise

Rick Stein’s Roast Tronçon Of Turbot With Hollandaise Sauce

SHARE THIS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Back by popular demand is super chef Rick Stein’s Roast Tronçon of Turbot with Hollandaise Sauce from his recipe book Rick Stein’s Taste of the Sea.

The tronçon, a steak cut from a big fish, is accompanied by not only the Hollandaise but also with a thin, very well-seasoned liquor which is flavoured with chopped fresh parsley, tarragon, chervil and chives.

Serves 4

25 g (1 oz) unsalted butter

4 steaks or tronçons of turbot, each weighing about 225-275 g (18-10 oz)

85 ml (3 fl oz) fish Stock

1 teaspoon chopped fresh fines herbes: parsley, French tarragon, chives, chervil

¼ teaspoon Thai fish sauce (nam pla) or a pinch of salt

Juice of ½ lemon

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 quantity Hollandaise Sauce (see recipe below)

Preheat oven to 230°C/450°F/Gas 8. Heat a frying pan and melt a small piece of butter. Add the tronçons and quickly brown them before transferring to a roasting tray. Season with salt and pepper then roast in the oven for about 15 minutes.

To make the sauce, combine the fish stock, the fines herbes, the Thai fish sauce or salt, the lemon juice and the remaining butter in a small pan and bring to the boil.

Arrange the tronçons on four warmed plates and just cover the top of each tronçons with the fines herbes sauce. Spoon the Hollandaise sauce onto the plate against one side of each tronçons. Serve with some plainly boiled new potatoes and a simple green vegetable such as spinach, French beans or mangetout.

I would suggest a South African Chardonnay to go with this. They seem to me to fall between the full roundness of Australian Chardonnay and the elusive subtlety of Burgundies, having a little of each. I particularly like those from Stellenbosch.

Hollandaise Sauce

I like my Hollandaise sauce to be well-flavoured with plenty of lemon juice and cayenne, and well-seasoned. You will need a wire whisk, a stainless steel whisking bowl and a saucepan into which it will fit.

Serves 4

225 g (8 oz) unsalted butter

2 tablespoons water

2 egg yolks

Juice of 1 lemon

A good pinch of cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon salt

Clarify the butter by heating it gently in a pan until the solids fall to the bottom. Pour off the clear butter and reserve. Discard the butter solids.

Half fill a pan with water and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and place a stainless steel bowl on top of the pan. Pour in the 2 tablespoons of water, add the egg yolks and whisk the mixture until it is voluminous and creamy.

Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in the clarified butter a little at a time, building up an emulsion as if making mayonnaise. Add the lemon juice, the cayenne pepper and salt.

Hollandaise is best used immediately but you can hold the sauce for anything up to 2 hours if you keep it in a warm place (about 60°C/140°F) with a lid on. If the sauce does split, it is actually very easy to reform it. just take a new pan, warm it and add one tablespoon of hot water. Then whisk in the curdled sauce a little at a time.

Picture Credit: Photographer David Griffen

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

related articles

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

more stories

Join our mailing list

Never miss our seriously happy global news!
Subscribe to our weekly newsletter: