Up, Up and Away! 7-Eleven Successfully Delivers Slurpee Drink to Space

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Up, Up and Away! 7-Eleven Successfully Delivers Slurpee Drink to Space

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A 7-Eleven Slurpee, the iconic beverage that’s been enjoyed by millions of Americans since 1966, was officially delivered where no Slurpee drink has been before … to space! 

The Slurpee drink took off at 11 AM earlier this month, from a 7-Eleven® store in Michigan, the Slurpee capital of the U.S. (aka the state that consumes the most Slurpee drinks). The Slurpee rocketed out of the Earth’s atmosphere on a private space flight commissioned by the convenience store retailer in honour of its 94th birthday.

Fans collectively selected Coca-Cola as the first Slurpee flavour to go to space. It was the most popular flavour ordered via 7-Eleven Delivery in the 7-Eleven app during the month of July, as reported by Convenience Store News. Cherry and Blue Raspberry were close runners-up.

Delivering our iconic Slurpee drink to space and bringing customers along for the journey was the most epic way to wrap up one of the brand’s best birthdays to date. Year 94 will be a hard one to top… literally.”

Marissa Jarratt, 7-Eleven senior vice president and chief marketing officer

Coca-Cola, as well as Pepsi, first launched into orbit on NASA’s 19th space shuttle mission, STS-51F, onboard the orbiter Challenger. In special “space cans,” the drinks were apparently warm and not very satisfying according to the astronauts. They did have fun with them, however, and used them for forming carbonated Coke balls to float around the cabin. Coca-Cola later flew on two more shuttle missions, testing more sophisticated pressurized cups and a multi-flavour dispenser, but it was ultimately retired from spaceflight in 1996.

In actuality, the 7-Eleven flight had the potential to climb a few times higher than the cruising altitude of a commercial airliner but fell short of reaching even the lowest definition of outer space by more than 100,000 feet (30,480 m). By U.S. definition, space begins at 50 miles high (262,000 ft or 80 km), whereas the world’s record-keeping body sets the boundary at 62 miles (328,000 ft or 100 km).

But one thing remains indisputable, even as the debate continues as to where Earth ends and outer space begins: a 7-Eleven Slurpee has come closer to leaving the planet than any convenience store-dispensed drink has done before.

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