Tunnel Vision Gets A Whole New Meaning For Homebuilders

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Tunnel Vision Gets A Whole New Meaning For Homebuilders

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The UK may be a small island, but we have more than our share of eccentrics. We also get rather a lot of rain. So, if you want to get to your man shed without getting wet, there’s really only one solution – build a tunnel.

That’s exactly what inventor Colin Furze from Stamford in Lincolnshire did during two years of back-breaking work.

Clearly channelling his inner Steve McQueen, Colin began his own Great Escape between a kitchen cupboard and his shed, digging by hand to carve out the tunnel which is 3 metres deep and 12 metres long and runs underneath his garden.

The 42-year-old shifted an astonishing three and a half tonnes of rubble a day and has now completed the underground walkway.

You and I might think an umbrella might have been a quicker and easier option, but Colin, a regular YouTuber, claims it’s one of the best things he has ever done.

‘It’s a very cool project, everyone likes the idea of digging tunnels. I do projects that people really want to do but don’t have the time or money to actually make happen.

‘It’s  quicker to open my back door and walk to my shed, but it’s much more fun to use an underground tunnel and it means you don’t get wet if it’s raining.’

Colin started the tunnel under his shed floor in November 2018 and it took him around a year to dig down to three-and-a-half metres deep, working on it when his neighbours were out so it wasn’t too noisy. 

He used a shovel and a bucket with a pulley system to hoist the rubble out of the hole as it got deeper. 

He re-started the tunnel in March last year, using hydraulics to dig sideways through the earth and rock and aided by his mates Rick Simpson and Tom Lamb. 

As the tunnel got longer Colin even built a small mine cart and track to help transport the rubble out of the hole. 

‘We had to dig the whole thing by hand as the tunnel goes underneath the foundations of my shed, garage and house,’ said Colin.

‘It was very hard work but also one of the most enjoyable things I have ever done. 

‘We wanted to keep the noise down for my neighbours so used a shovel and hydraulics, which were really quiet.’

The tunnel, which is 1.2 metres wide and two metres high and comes up in a cupboard in Colin’s kitchen, has been reinforced with steel and concrete.

And apparently, visitors to his home can’t resist trying the tunnel out for size.

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